Does the term “climate change” need a makeover? Some think so — here’s why.

Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old [mentally defective puppet] who [believes the lie that she] leads a global climate movement, asked in a recent tweet, “Can we all now please stop saying ‘climate change’ and instead call it what it is: climate breakdown, climate crisis, climate emergency, ecological breakdown, ecological crisis and ecological emergency?”

[No dear idjit child, the intellgent ones here aren’t going to be driven by emotion, but rather by logic, facts and real science, not your handler’s hyperbolic horse$#!+]

She’s not alone in her sentiment. Many of those engaged in environmental advocacy feel the termclimate changefails to convey the specificity or urgency needed to address the gravity of the climate challenge.

A new recent study shows they may be right.

New York City-based SPARK Neuro, a neuroanalytics company that measures emotion and attention, studied how participants responded to six terms — “climate crisis,” “environmental destruction,” “environmental collapse,” “weather destabilization,” “global warming” and “climate change.”

A total of 120 people — 40 Republicans, 40 Democrats and 40 independents — participated in the study, which measured the “emotional intensity” of responses to audio recordings of various controversial phrases, with each term inserted, like this example below:

“Sea levels will rise dramatically, to the point that many coastal cities will be submerged, as a result of [INSERT TERM].” 

The electrical activity of the participants’ brains and skin was rated on a scale of zero to five — five being the strongest. Those results were then compared to a traditional survey for reference.

Two terms stood out from the pack: climate crisis and environmental destruction.

Among Democrats, the study found a 60% greater emotional response to the term “climate crisis” than to “climate change,” and a tripling in emotional response among Republicans.

Spencer Gerrol, CEO of SPARK Neuro, said evoking emotion is vital to getting people to act. Because terms like climate change and global warming do not imply good or bad, they don’t spark passion, he said.