Hong Kong protests: Students fight police with petrol bombs, bows and arrows

Classic reference: “Sure would be nice if we had some grenades….

The campus of one of Hong Kong’s top universities turned into a battleground on Tuesday as student protesters fought with police well into the night.

After police entered the campus, protesters set up roadblocks, formed human chains to pass supplies, and made weapons including petrol bombs.

Others fought back with bows and arrows, as police fired volleys of tear gas and rubber bullets at the crowd.

The ISIS Caliph Is Dead – But Who Was Protecting Him?

It strains credulity that Turkey, with its interests in northern Syria, did not know he was there. Al-Baghdadi was killed in Barisha in the Idlib province, a town of no more than 2500 people right on the Turkish border. If the Turks didn’t know that the world’s most wanted terrorist was there, they’re incompetent beyond measure. If they did know, they’re complicit in protecting him.

Given the track record of the Turkish government in aiding the Islamic State, complicity is much more likely than cluelessness. There ought to be a full investigation of Turkey’s involvement, and if the Erdogan regime is definitively found to have been protecting al-Baghdadi, Turkey should be expelled from NATO and the sham alliance with the United States ended. Given, however, the determined head-in-the-sand policy of the State Department establishment, none of that is likely to happen.

Pence Backs Hong Kong Protests in China Speech, Slams NBA and Nike

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Thursday accused China of curtailing “rights and liberties” in Hong Kong and blasted U.S. company Nike and the National Basketball Association for falling in line with Beijing in a disagreement over free speech.

In a major policy speech on China that touched on an array of disputes ahead of talks with Beijing to ease a trade war, Pence said the United States does not seek confrontation or to “de-couple” from its main economic rival.

But he pulled no punches when addressing some of the political rifts between the two countries.