Why the Dickey Amendment Was Passed

It appears from this article that this article in NEJM provoked it. While there is no direct statement: “guns should be banned,” this quote conveys some of the language that is pretty clearly intended for that purpose: “Despite the widely held belief that guns are effective for protection, our results suggest that they actually pose a substantial threat to members of the household. People who keep guns in their homes appear to be at greater risk of homicide in the home than people who do not. Most of this risk is due to a substantially greater risk of homicide at the hands of a family member or intimate acquaintance. We did not find evidence of a protective effect of keeping a gun in the home, even in the small subgroup of cases that involved forced entry.”

That they excluded lawful uses is pretty indicative of cherry-picking the data: “Although our case definition excluded the rare instances in which a nonresident intruder was killed by a homeowner, our methodology was capable of demonstrating significant protective effects of gun ownership as readily as any evidence of increased risk.” They assume that “a nonresident intruder was killed by a homeowner” is rare, and exclude defensive uses that do not lead to death of an intruder.
Here are 1155 gun defensive uses involving home invasions.
And 492 residential burglary cases.
And 326 residence robbery incidents.
Many did not leave a bad guy dead. Excluding such cases is misleading.

Colorado Supreme Court considers gun magazine limit

DENVER (AP) — Gun rights groups are urging the Colorado Supreme Court to follow guidance from the U.S. Supreme Court to throw out the state’s ban on gun magazines that hold more than 15 rounds.

In arguments before the state court Wednesday, the groups’ lawyer, Barry Arrington, said that since the U.S. Supreme Court has found that the right to bear arms is a fundamental right, the state has a heavier burden to prove that the magazine limit is needed. He said they cannot meet that standard.

The law was passed in 2013, a year after the Aurora theater shooting, in an effort to limit the number of deaths in mass shootings. While large capacity magazines were used in the Columbine and Aurora shootings, Arrington said that have also been widely used by gun owners, with millions of them in existence when the law was passed.

\The legal challenge brought by Rocky Mountain Gun Owners and the National Association for Gun Rights is based on the gun rights’ provision in the Colorado Constitution, which expressly protects the right of people to be armed to defend their homes, property and themselves. Given that, Colorado Solicitor General Eric Olson told the justices they have the right to interpret the state’s constitution on their own, noting that U.S. Supreme Court guidance changes over time.

Olson argued the state Supreme Court should instead stick with the approach it established in 1994 in a challenge to an assault weapons ban passed by Denver — deciding whether a law furthers a legitimate government interest without being too broad.

The case that Arrington wants the state court to look to came later. In 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Americans have a constitutional right to keep handguns and commonly used firearms in their homes for self-defense. The ruling struck down the District of Columbia’s 32-year handgun ban as incompatible with gun rights under the Second Amendment.

Hong Kong protests: Students fight police with petrol bombs, bows and arrows

Classic reference: “Sure would be nice if we had some grenades….

The campus of one of Hong Kong’s top universities turned into a battleground on Tuesday as student protesters fought with police well into the night.

After police entered the campus, protesters set up roadblocks, formed human chains to pass supplies, and made weapons including petrol bombs.

Others fought back with bows and arrows, as police fired volleys of tear gas and rubber bullets at the crowd.

Colorado gun stores still sell high-capacity magazines despite 2013 law banning them
Magazines that hold more than 15 rounds of ammunition are still being sold in Colorado. Legislators thought that they banned them, but gun store employees describe a loophole in the law.

A state law banning the sale and transfer of large-capacity gun magazines has not stopped the sale and transfer of magazines that hold more than 15 rounds of ammunition.

An undercover investigation by 9Wants to Know found examples of gun stores in Colorado either ignoring the law altogether or finding a loophole to get around the law.

“It’s shocking to see that people are doing this,” said state Sen. Rhonda Fields, D-Aurora.

In 2013, a Democratically-controlled state legislature passed four comprehensive bills dealing with guns, including the bill sponsored by Fields banning magazines that hold more than 15 bullets.

The bill, signed into law by then-Gov. John Hickenlooper, banned the sale, transfer and possession of a large-capacity magazine as of July 1, 2013.

“…wholly ineffective, which your video shows.”

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah.

 

ISIS Bride Who Wanted to ‘Spill Blood’ of Americans Pleads to Return: ‘I Want to Have My Own Car’

Her own car? What for, so she can make it a VBIED?
I’d give her a ride though. Straight to hell.
Yes, I believe in equal opportunity for all jihadies.

NBC News wants you to pity Hoda Muthana, and who are you, O mortal, to answer back to NBC News? Hoda is a simple, down-to-earth, hijab-wearing Alabama gal who decided one day to travel to Syria to join the Islamic State (ISIS). But hey, everyone makes mistakes, right? “I want to have my own car,” pines Hoda, and how could you possibly resist such an all-American appeal?

Only the most grudging “Islamophobe” would dare to note that Hoda’s desire to have her own car is downright chilling in light of her earlier call for Muslims in America to “go on drive-bys, and spill all of their blood” — that is, the blood of the unbelievers that Hoda can’t wait to return and live among now………….

According to NBC, Hoda Muthana’s plight, her fear, her difficulty getting out of bed, her stomach aches, her headaches, her day-to-day struggle, is the fault of – who else? – President Trump, who said several months ago that he had ordered Secretary of State Mike Pompeo not to allow Hoda to reenter the United States. The Trump administration contends that Hoda is not an American citizen, for while she was born in New Jersey, she is the daughter of a Yemeni government official who was only here temporarily, and so is not entitled to birthright citizenship. Pompeo also bluntly stated the core of the problem with her returning to Alabama: “She’s a terrorist.”

Alarming poll on First Amendment justifies zealous defense of the Second

Retired Circuit Justice Kozinski once said:
“The Second Amendment is a doomsday provision, one designed for those exceptionally rare circumstances where all other rights have failed—where the government refuses to stand for reelection and silences those who protest; where courts have lost the courage to oppose, or can find no one to enforce their decrees. However improbable these contingencies may seem today, facing them unprepared is a mistake a free people get to make only once.
Fortunately, the Framers were wise enough to entrench the right of the people to keep and bear arms within our constitutional structure. The purpose and importance of that right was still fresh in their minds, and they spelled it out clearly so it would not be forgotten.”

It seems that “….silences those who protest.” is not so  ‘improbable’ these days, is it?

A poll conducted by Caravan Surveys for the Campaign for Free Speech revealed alarming support among Americans for rewriting the First Amendment and underscores the danger of putting constitutionally-protected fundamental rights up to a public vote.

According to the survey, “some 51 percent of people in the US believe that the (First) amendment…should be updated to reflect the cultural norms of today.” The poll of 1,004 respondents also revealed that 48 percent believe “hate speech,” while not defined, should be illegal and half of the people think punishment should include possible imprisonment or fines. A whopping 57 percent of poll respondents think the government should be able to penalize news agencies for publishing “content that is biased, inflammatory, or false.”

The poll results have frightening ramifications for our free speech and free press rights. The fact that a majority of people now seem to be rethinking our freedoms guaranteed under the Bill of Rights should be troubling to all Americans.

What is equally troubling is the failure of the establishment media to see the parallels between this sudden attack on the First Amendment and the ongoing crusade against the Second Amendment.

As authors of the recently-released book “Good Guys with Guns,” we recognize there are good journalists with keyboards and bad journalists with keyboards. Good ones should not be penalized for the misbehavior of the bad ones. The same principle must apply to how we treat the rights of more than 100 million American gun owners who have never harmed anyone or committed any crime, yet how many editorial pages have repeatedly demanded more restrictions on the Second Amendment because some people break the law?

When talking about constitutionally-enumerated rights, great care must be taken to separate rights from privileges. For too many years, far too many people in the media have treated the Second Amendment as a privilege to be heavily regulated. The Campaign for Free Speech poll puts such corrosive thinking in its proper perspective.

Simply, you cannot advocate restrictions or abolition of your neighbors’ rights, which you don’t support, without putting your own rights at risk. With the release of these new survey results, that vulture has come home to roost.

Tacoma City Council Increases Prices on Firearm, Ammunition Sales

I guess a city in Washington state can do this even when the state legislature has preemption on gun law. If it was me with a gun business in Tacoma, I’d move right outside the city limits and advertise like crazy.

The Tacoma, Washington, City Council voted Tuesday to increase prices on firearm and ammunition sales within city limits.
Fox News reports that the council did this by passing new taxes that will amount to an additional $25 on the price of every gun, two cents on the price of every round of .22 ammunition, and five cents on the price of every round of ammunition that is of higher caliber than .22.

The council approved the tax hike by a vote of 8-0.

The council expects the city of Tacoma to “raise about $300,000 annually” off the imposition, and they say they will use the money to fight violence.

On August 12, 2015, Breitbart News reported Seattle’s adoption of a similar tax and less than two years later Money reported, “It didn’t work.”

Money reported Seattle’s City Council predicted the tax would “raise $300,000 to $500,000” annually. In reality, it brought in less than $200,000. However, the National Shooting Sports Foundation reported that the tax did achieve one end–it drove licensed, law-abiding gun dealers outside of city limits where they could avoid paying the tax.

Also, violence in Seattle surged as licensed gun dealers moved outside the city to avoid the new taxes.

 

KCK homeowner shoots, injures intruder

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A Kansas City, Kansas, homeowner shot an intruder overnight Wednesday in the 1900 block of Key Lane.

The victim told police he was startled by a noise in his home.

The homeowner found the suspect and shot him.

The suspect was taken to the hospital and is in stable condition.

Police have classified the incident as aggravated burglary and aggravated battery.

SEN. HIRONO: AMERICANS SHOULD ‘BELIEVE IN CLIMATE CHANGE AS THOUGH IT’S RELIGION’

Her level of intelligence never has impressed me

Even as she acknowledged its not a religion, Sen. Mazi Hirono (D-Hawaii.) encouraged Americans Tuesday to embrace climate change “as though it’s religion.”

Hirono was speaking to a group of DACA activists at a Center for American Progress organized prayer breakfast. The gathering preceded the group marching to the Supreme Court, where the high court is hearing arguments on President Trump’s effort to end Deferred Action Against Childhood Arrivals (or, DACA).

Listing action items for the gathered immigration activists, Sen. Hirono included climate change

Sen. Hirono said: “And the third [thing to do] is, leaving our comfort zone. And for a lot of us, protesting, marching, that’s not something that we normally do, but, you know what? These are times that call for us to do those things that we believe in and to march.”

“And not just to march,” she continued, “because that’s important to show solidarity, but then to do those things, such as voter registration, get people to — out to vote so that we can have people here who truly are committed to human rights and environmental rights, climate change, believe in climate change as though it’s a religion (it’s not it’s a science), and all the things that remains to be done and there’s a lot.”

“This is a very divided country,” she said, “these are not normal times.”

Woman shot while attempting to break into apartments

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – A woman was shot while attempting to break into a Raleigh apartment she claimed was hers. Police were called to The Coves at Yale apartments in the 5000 block of Yale Road Sunday. Erika Glass is charged with aggravated burglary.

One neighbor said she was asleep when she heard someone trying to break into several homes. “I heard a boom coming from across the hall, and my husband, my daughter and I jumped,” she told FOX13. “And I heard after that a woman say ‘She shot me.’”

The resident told FOX13 that Glass started banging on her patio door around 4 a.m. Sunday. That’s when she heard noises that sounded like gunshots and glass breaking. “I haven’t really slept since then,” she said.

She told FOX13 she heard someone trying to get in through her 15-year-old son’s bedroom window. “My neighbors said he or she was going around twisting the nobs and ringing the doorbells,” she said.

The victim told police she asked Glass to get away from her door. She said Glass wouldn’t leave. That’s when the suspect allegedly broke the glass on the patio door.

According to police, the victim shot the suspect when she came into the home.

Another neighbor told FOX13, “I heard at least 2 or three that’s when I was like da**, somebody shooting outside for real.”

Police found the 32-year-old Glass on Yale Road when they arrived. Officers said she was covered in blood and holding mail, trash and a water hydrant cover in her hands.

Glass, whose last address is listed as Ripley, told police the apartment belonged to her and that the victim needed to get out. “My momma, she stay here. I got a little girl that stay here with me. So my momma she elderly. If she would have came, my momma would have let rounds off too,” a neighbor told FOX13.

He said he did not open his door when someone tried to break in his home that same morning.

The victim who allegedly shot the suspect was not home when FOX13 attempted to speak with her.

This just in:

The Supreme Court has denied cert. for the Remington v Soto case in Connecticut where the state is allowing a suit against Remington to proceed under their  Unfair Trade Practice law.

The orders list is here:

CERTIORARI DENIED

19-168 REMINGTON ARMS CO., LLC, ET AL. V. SOTO, DONNA L., ET AL

SCOTUS Gun Watch, Episode 4

More surprising to me than the fact that the Court denied review was the fact that there was no noted dissent from the denial.

Alex Vindman Is Living, Breathing Proof That The Deep State Exists, And It Is Corrupt.
Democrats and the Deep State have elevated more policy disagreements to what amounts to an attempted coup. Just listen to Alex Vindman.

Remember the original ‘Seven Days In May’ movie with Kirk Douglas and Burt Lancaster? A military officer let his supposed patriotism override his oath to defend the Constitution ( which makes the President the head of State and maker of Policy) because he didn’t hold with the political and policy decisions of the President and decided to do something about it. This is as close a deal as you can get in real life to what this officer did: Decide he didn’t like the President’s policy as it conflicted with what he figured policy should be.

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman is living, breathing, testifying proof the Deep State exists. He has shown his true colors and the agenda of the self-appointed elites who think they run this country.

Let me state categorically that I am not implying dual loyalty or questioning Vindman’s patriotism or even his devotion to duty as he sees it. I’m questioning his judgment about where that duty lies and the execution of those duties as a military officer and civil servant.

Vindman’s Testimony Gives the Game Away

But Vindman gave the game away with his prepared testimony. He believes the permanent bureaucracy should reign supreme, and if some elected politician gets crosswise with the solons of the state, then they must act. So he did, as he detailed in his prepared statement and testimony to Congress. From the statement: “In the Spring of 2019, I became aware of outside influencers promoting a false narrative of Ukraine inconsistent with the consensus views of the interagency. This narrative was harmful to U.S. government policy.”

There is a lot of wrong in those two sentences, which profoundly illustrate the fundamental flaw Vindman and his fellow Deep Staters operate under. The interagency he mentions is a collection of staff from the major agencies like the State Department, Department of Defense, and intelligence agencies, who meet to coordinate and plan implementation of policy. They most certainly are not supposed to decide what policy the United States will follow. That is 100 percent the purview of the president.

Kenneth Anderson: The Fragmenting of the New Class Elites, or, Downward Mobility.

In social theory, OWS is best understood not as a populist movement against the bankers, but instead as the breakdown of the New Class into its two increasingly disconnected parts. The upper tier, the bankers-government bankers-super credentialed elites. But also the lower tier, those who saw themselves entitled to a white collar job in the Virtue Industries of government and non-profits – the helping professions, the culture industry, the virtueocracies, the industries of therapeutic social control, as Christopher Lasch pointed out in his final book, The Revolt of the Elites.

The two tiers of the New Class have always had different sources of rents, however. For the upper tier, since 1990, it has come through its ability to take the benefits of generations of US social investment in education and sell that expertise across global markets – leveraging expertise and access to capital and technological markets in the 1990s to places in Asia and the former communist world in desperate need of it.

As Lasch said, the revolt and flight of the elites, to marketize themselves globally as free agents – to take the social capital derived over many generations by American society, and to go live in the jet stream and extract returns on a global scale for that expertise. But that expertise is now largely commodified – to paraphrase David Swenson on financial engineering, that kind of universal expertise is commodified, cheaply available, and no longer commands much premium. As those returns have come under pressure, the Global New Class has come home, looking to command premiums through privileged access to the public-private divide – access most visible at the moment as virtuous new technology projects that turn out to be mere crony capitalism.

The lower tier is in a different situation and always has been. It is characterized by status-income disequilibrium, to borrow from David Brooks; it cultivates the sensibilities of the upper tier New Class, but does not have the ability to globalize its rent extraction.

The helping professions, the professions of therapeutic authoritarianism (the social workers as well as the public safety workers), the virtuecrats, the regulatory class, etc., have a problem – they mostly service and manage individuals, the client-consumers of the welfare state. Their rents are not leveraged very much, certainly not globally, and are limited to what amounts to an hourly wage.

The method of ramping up wages, however, is through public employee unions and their own special ability to access the public-private divide. But, as everyone understands, that model no longer works, because it has overreached and overleveraged, to the point that even the system’s most sympathetic politicians understand that it cannot pay up.

The upper tier is still doing pretty well. But the lower tier of the New Class – the machine by which universities trained young people to become minor regulators and then delivered them into white collar positions on the basis of credentials in history, political science, literature, ethnic and women’s studies – with or without the benefit of law school – has broken down.

The supply is uninterrupted, but the demand has dried up. The agony of the students getting dumped at the far end of the supply chain is in large part the OWS. As Above the Law points out, here is “John,” who got out of undergrad, spent a year unemployed and living at home, and is now apparently at University of Vermont law school, with its top ranked environmental law program – John wants to work at a “nonprofit.”

Pity the poor avocado-eating graduates: University-educated millennials have absorbed elite values but will never enjoy the lifestyle.

Countless articles have rehearsed the class insecurities of the “left behind” Brexiters. Generally these unfortunates are depicted fulminating over pasties and ale in shabby market towns and grim post-industrial cities outside the London area. The object of their antipathy is the shiny “elite”, plugged into a promise-filled, multicultural urban life and the knowledge economy, seemingly buoyant in the new, frictionless modern world.

Leaving aside its substantive, real-world pros and cons, Europhilia has become a mark of devotion to the culture and worldview associated with this “elite” and the modern world it navigates. It is a value set strongly correlated with tertiary education and that has come to be called “openness”. . . .

Meanwhile, the boom in openness-promoting tertiary education produced not so much a boom in graduate jobs as inflation in the qualification levels required to do the jobs we already had. This has left many young people struggling to service a mountain of debt on salaries that are never likely to show much of the “graduate premium” they were promised.

Today, thanks in part to the “open” economy whose values form the foundation of the “cultural Remain” identity, the cost of living — and especially home ownership — has rocketed. Simple aspirations that were within the reach of the working class in the 20th century are an unattainable dream today for millions of young people far higher up the sociocultural pile. And yet those young graduates have all, in the course of moving away to get their degree, absorbed the “open” value set now explicitly taught in tertiary education.

The result is an Everywhere precariat, that has absorbed the values of a world that has little to offer it in terms of concrete benefits, and resolves this conflict by renting the heavily-subsidised and internet-enabled perks of a smarter lifestyle than it can afford to buy. Where once rentals might have just been housing and cars, today that can even include clothing.

Nikki Haley blows the lid off Cabinet-level insubordination (AKA #resistance) against Trump

Donald Trump’s election has triggered a level of treachery that threatens the basis of our constitutional republic.  The words “constitutional crisis” are bandied about too often, but this incident fits the bill all too well.  Former U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley is promoting her book that debuts tomorrow and gave an interview yesterday to CBS in which she revealed the shocking news that two senior appointees to the Trump White House were conspiring against him and attempted to enlist her in their cabal to seize his constitutional powers for themselves.

Fox News summarizes:

Former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley blasted former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and former White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, recalling a private conversation where they defended resisting President Trump, telling her they did so out of necessity.

Haley told “CBS Evening News” anchor Norah O’Donnell that she did not appreciate having the former officials confide in her, as she described in her new book, “With All Due Respect.”

“[I]nstead of saying that to me, they should’ve been saying that to the president, not asking me to join them on their sidebar plan,” Haley said.

Haley said that the two men “confided in me that when they resisted the president, they weren’t being insubordinate, they were trying to save the country” and how “Tillerson went on to tell me the reason he resisted the president’s decisions was because, if he didn’t, people would die….”

“Saving the country” is the excuse offered by virtually all coup-plotters when they override the established powers and install their own people in power.  It is the logic of a banana republic.  Haley responded entirely appropriately:

“It should’ve been, ‘Go tell the president what your differences are, and quit if you don’t like what he’s doing,'” Haley told O’Donnell. “But to undermine a president is really a very dangerous thing. And it goes against the Constitution, and it goes against what the American people want. And it was offensive.”

Here’s the entire interview.