Man killed while trying to break into Henderson home

HENDERSON, N.C. — A man trying to break into a Henderson home was shot and killed early Monday, police said.

Police responded to a reported shooting at 232 Crozier St. at about 2 a.m. and found a man dead outside a window to the home. A preliminary investigation determined that the dead man, whose name hasn’t been released, was trying to break in when someone inside the home shot him, police said.

The shooting remains under investigation, but no charges have been filed.

Neighbors said they weren’t sure what could have made the home a target for a burglary other an empty television box sitting outside.

“I was just shocked,” said one woman who asked not to be identified. “I came out when I saw all the police. That’s when I realized someone was lying on the ground dead.”


Victim scares off potential Warren robber with gun

A woman tells Warren police that she shot at a man that tried to rob her outside of her home.

Police responded to an attempted robbery in the 700 block of Willard Ave on September 9 just before noon.

The victim told police that as she pulled her car into the driveway and exited the vehicle, a tall man wearing a red shirt and tan pants approached her from behind.

According to the report, the victim then pulled out a gun but was punched in the face by the suspect.

The suspect then fled down the victim’s driveway.

The victim then called the police to make a report.

According to authorities, while the victim was sitting on the front porch waiting for police to arrive, she walked into her backyard.

While she was in the backyard, the suspect returned, but this time the victim warned him and said that he would shoot at him if he didn’t run away.

The suspect moved closer to the victim, and she shot at him. The suspect then ran away.

Warren officers checked the surrounding area, but they could not find the suspect.

Democratic-Controlled House Judiciary Committee Approves Anti-Gun Measures For A Vote

Well, to no one’s surprise, the Democratic-controlled House Judiciary Committee approved several anti-gun measures for a vote, including red flag laws, a ban on so-called large-capacity magazines, and expanded background checks. It’s the same old story with the anti-gun Left. Red flag laws are an issue. We should always be on the alert, but an expanded background checks bill is the enemy at the gates. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can nuke all of these proposals but said he’d put a background check bill for a vote if it had the backing of Trump. And that goes for the rest of the Senate GOP caucus (via CBS News):

The House Judiciary Committee voted to send several gun control bills to the House floor for a full vote on Tuesday, even as the Senate and President Trump vacillate on support for less restrictive proposals.

The committee meeting, known as a markup, came after three deadly mass shootings in the month of August that killed 38 people in total. House Democrats urged the Senate to hold an emergency session to vote on a bill passed by the House in February which would implement universal background checks, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell resisted the call.

McConnell recently said that he is waiting on Mr. Trump to signal which gun control measure, if any, he supports, before acting in the Senate. He said that he would bring a background checks bill to the Senate floor only if it had Mr. Trump’s support and he was certain “we will pass it and it’ll become law.”

Speaking to reporters on Tuesday, McConnell said that Democratic tactics were “theatrics,” given that Mr. Trump has not said that he would sign any of the gun control legislation under consideration in the House.

“We are working on coming up with a proposal that the president will sign. Until that happens, all of this is theatrics,” McConnell said.

Mr. Trump has sent mixed signals about whether he would support background checks.

[…]

H.R. 1236, the “Extreme Risk Protection Order Act of 2019”: This bill would provide grants to help state, tribal and local efforts to remove firearms from individuals determined to be a danger to themselves or others. Extreme Risk Protection Order (ERPO) laws are more commonly known as “red flag” laws.

H.R. 1186, the “Keep Americans Safe Act”: This bill would regulate large capacity ammunition feeding devices, such as a magazine or belt, making it illegal to import, sell, manufacture or possess such devices.

H.R. 2708, the “Disarm Hate Act”: This bill would prevent a person convicted of a misdemeanor hate crime from obtaining a firearm.

Top Three Rated “Safe States” are Constitutional Carry States

US News and World Report rates the states for public safety. The rating takes both property crime and violent crime into account. The ratings use the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) data from 2017 for the article this year, as the latest data available.

The top three states for public safety this year are Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire. All three are Constitutional Carry states, which means no permit is required to carry a loaded handgun in most public places, openly, or concealed. That was the state of the law in the nation when the Constitution was ratified on 4 March, 1789. Constitutional carry existed in all states for the first four decades of the Republic. Then states and the courts started chipping away at the Second Amendment.

Vermont has always been a Constitutional Carry state. No permit has been required to carry handguns there since the Constitution was ratified.

Maine became a Constitutional Carry state in 2015. At the time, those opposed claimed that Constitutional Carry would increase street violence. From pressherald.com:

Tom Franklin, president of Maine Citizens Against Handgun Violence, predicted that passage will lead to more street violence and deaths. The group works to prevent gun violence through gun safety and education.

“I believe this bill reflects the current state of dysfunction in Augusta,” Franklin said Monday night during a telephone interview. “It does not reflect the wishes of Maine people.”

He said his group is deeply concerned about allowing people to carry handguns without a permit.It hasn’t happened. Maine followed the same script as has happened in other states that restore Constitutional Carry. Mostly, nothing but a restoration of personal freedom.

New Hampshire restored Constitutional Carry in 2017.  Opponents said the law would result in dead kids. From nhpr.org:

Although those in favor of the legislation argued the bill would not be a safety hazard, Rep. Wayne Burton of Durham told his colleagues it was too risky.

“I think a few inconvenient people is far less important that 12 dead kids,” Burton said Wednesday.It did not happen. New Hampshire continued to be a very safe state.

Of the top ten states on the US News and World Report list, five of them are in Constitutional Carry states. Those states are shown in bold print.  The top ten are:

  1.  Maine

  2.  Vermont

  3.  New Hampshire

  4.  New Jersey

  5.  Idaho

  6.  Virginia

  7.  Rhode Island

  8.  Connecticut

  9.  Wyoming

  10.  Massachusetts

109 Minutes.

At 8:48 a.m. Mohammed Atta took a jet headlong into the north tower of the World Trade Center. Eighteen minutes later and accomplice did the same to the south tower.

When Jeremy Glick called his wife, his first question was an attempt to confirm something another passenger had heard on his spousal call: was the World Trade Center story true?

Lizzy Glick paused, thought for a minute, swallowed hard, and told him the truth. Yes, they had. Moments later, still on the line with her husband, Lizzy Glick saw that another plane had run into the Pentagon. She passed that information on as well to her husband, who relayed it to the other passengers.

Jeremy Glick then told her that the passengers were about to take a vote and decide if they should rush the hijackers and attempt to foul up whatever evil plans they had.

He put down the phone and a commotion was heard by those on the other end of the line. Then nothing. A dead line. An aborted missile launch against the town where I live.

That was 10:37 a.m. on Tuesday, September 11… just 109 minutes after Mohammed Atta rammed the first plane into the north tower of the World Trade Center.

Just 109 minutes after a new form of terrorism — the most deadly yet invented — came into use, it was rendered, if not obsolete, at least decidedly less effective.

Deconstructed, unengineered, thwarted, and put into the dust bin of history. By Americans. In 109 minutes.

And in retrospect, they did it in the most American of ways. They used a credit card to rent a fancy cell phone to get information just minutes old, courtesy of the ubiquitous 24-hour news phenomenon. Then they took a vote. When the vote called for sacrifice to protect country and others, there apparently wasn’t a shortage of volunteers. Their action was swift. It was decisive. And it was effective.

United Flight 93 did not hit a building. It did not kill anyone on the ground. It did not terrorize a city, despite the best drawn plans of the world’s most innovative madmen. Why? Because it had informed Americans on board who’d had 109 minutes to come up with a counteraction.

And the next time a hijacker full of hate pulls the same stunt with a single knife, he’ll get the same treatment and meet the same result as those on United Flight 93. Dead, yes. Murderous, yes. But successful? No.

The triumph of American values:

Unlike those on the earlier flights, the hostages on 93 understood they were aboard a flying bomb intended to kill thousands of their fellow citizens. They knew there would be no happy ending. So they gave us the next best thing, a hopeful ending.

Todd Beamer couldn’t get through to anyone except a telephone company operator, Lisa Jefferson. She told him about the planes that had smashed into the World Trade Center. Mr Beamer said they had a plan to jump the guys and asked her if she would pray with him, so they recited the 23rd Psalm: ‘Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me….’

Then he and the others rushed the hijackers. At 9.58 a.m., the plane crashed, not into the White House, but in some pasture outside Pittsburgh. As UPI’s James Robbins wrote, ‘The Era of Osama lasted about an hour and half or so, from the time the first plane hit the tower to the moment the General Militia of Flight 93 reported for duty.’

Exactly. The most significant development of 11 September is that it marks the day America began to fight back: 9/11 is not just Pearl Harbor but also the Doolittle Raid, all wrapped up in 90 minutes. No one will ever again hijack an American airliner with boxcutters, or, I’ll bet, with anything else — not because of predictably idiotic new Federal regulations, but because of the example of Todd Beamer’s ad hoc platoon. Faced with a novel and unprecedented form of terror, American technology (cellphones) combined with the oldest American virtue (self-reliance) to stop it cold in little more than an hour.

See the source image

Eighteen (18) years ago today, the U.S. was attacked by moslem jihadis who hijacked four American airliners and crashed them into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Virginia.

Passengers in one plane, United Flight 93, on learning of the others, decided to take matters in their own hands and try and take control back from the hijackers. They succeeded to the point that the plane crashed into a field in Pennsylvania instead of the purported target of the Capitol building in D.C.

There were two people I knew who were on duty that day with the Fire Department of New York; Lt. Peter C Martin of Rescue 2 and FF Keith A. Glascoe of Ladder 21.

The remains of Pete and most of his crew were found and returned to their families. Keith is still on duty.

I am honored to have known these heroes who would run into places where rational people were trying to escape from. I am also honored to have worked with people who took the fight right back at the people who planned this attack and made them pay a high price for their dastardly deeds.

Alyssa Milano praises meeting with Ted Cruz, says she’s ‘cautiously optimistic’ for gun reform

Actress/activist Alyssa Milano said she was “cautiously optimistic” after her sitdown with Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex., on Tuesday to discuss gun violence.

Milano met Cruz in his D.C. office along with Fred Guttenberg, whose daughter was killed in the 2018 Parkland shooting, and gun control activist Ben Jackson and live-streamed the conversation on Facebook, which lasted over an hour……………

Milano later added that the Republican lawmaker didn’t make any promises but agreed that there is a “serious problem,” which she considered to be a “good first step.”

Scalise says it’s unclear if bipartisan deal on guns will happen

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) said it’s unclear whether lawmakers can reach a bipartisan deal on gun legislation following a meeting with fellow Republican leaders at the White House on Tuesday.

The Louisiana Republican said while “good faith negotiations and conversations” are taking place between parties and chambers, he doesn’t feel the bills Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has advocated for the Senate to take up would prevent future instances of mass violence. Scalise said Tuesday’s talks centered around both potential new measures aimed at preventing future shootings and improving the implementation of current laws.

“We talked about some of the things that still need to be done to make the background check system work better, making current laws work better. There are a lot of gaps in our current laws where people are able to buy guns, who shouldn’t have been able to buy guns that had criminal records and other things that weren’t getting fed into the background check system,” he told reporters following the meeting.

“And so we passed a law to make that work better. He’s looking at, you know, what might be other laws that he can get an agreement on, but the other concern is, you know, do the Democrats actually want to solve problems or do they want to just be more aggressive about taking away people’s guns.”

Scalise’s comments come as lawmakers and the White House attempt to figure out the next steps toward crafting gun policies in the wake of two mass shootings that took place last month.

Pelosi has pushed for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to bring House-passed universal background checks legislation, which faces an uphill battle in the Republican-controlled upper chamber.

Sens. Toomey (R-Pa.)has crafted proposals with both Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) and Chris Coons (D-Del.), but it remains uncertain whether either plan can garner enough support or the support of the administration.

“We had a lengthy discussion about the fall agenda and there’s no announcements to come out of it. We talked about the things you would expect us to talk about—the appropriations process, the possibility of gun legislation, and it was a good discussion,” McConnell told reporters following the meeting.

Asked if he liked what he was hearing in the gun discussion, McConnell didn’t answer as the elevator doors closed.

A Modest Reaction to HARPA

If you’re not familiar with Mr. Cooke, add the ‘/sarc’ tag

The Washington Post reports:

The White House is considering a controversial proposal to study whether mass shootings could be prevented by monitoring mentally ill people for small changes that might foretell violence.

Former NBC Chairman Bob Wright, a longtime friend and associate of President Trump’s, has briefed top officials, including the president, the vice president and Ivanka Trump, on a proposal to create a new research agency called HARPA to come up with out-of-the-box ways to tackle health problems, much like DARPA does for the military, say several people who have briefed.

. . .

Advisers to Wright quickly pulled together a three-page proposal — called SAFEHOME for Stopping Aberrant Fatal Events by Helping Overcome Mental Extremes – which calls for exploring whether technology like phones and smart watches can be used to detect when mentally ill people are about to turn violent.

At first, I was horrified by this idea. But then I remembered that it’s “time for leadership” and that we have to “do something,” and all my objections disappeared upon the instant. Sure, there are obvious Fourth Amendment problems here. But, when you think about it, there’s no way that the Founding Fathers could have imagined cell phones or smart watches (where exactly does the Constitution mention them!?) — and, anyway, if you read the Fourth Amendment’s text you’ll notice that it uses the same “right of the people” language as does the Second Amendment, and that it should therefore be read to apply not to individuals but collectively.

The question we have to ask here is whether the freedom to use a high-bandwidth telephone is really more important than the lives of our kids. As the Trump administration has made clear, HARPA wouldn’t ban cell phones outright; it would just impose some common sense safety regulations on their use. What’s the problem? As one of the project’s architects has asked:

“To those who say this is a half-baked idea, I would say, ‘what’s your idea? What are you doing about this?’ ” said Geoffrey Ling, the lead scientific adviser on the HARPA proposal.

Exactly!

Rutgers announces eight new studies on gun violence

Mr & Mrs Giffords have their hands in all of them.

Rutgers’ New Jersey Center of Gun Violence Research has announced eight studies on gun violence and prevention to be led by University faculty, according to a press release……..

Last year, The Daily Targum reported that, in a partnership with former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords (D-Az.) and her husband Mark Kelly’s foundation, New Jersey donated a $2 million grant to the University to launch the New Jersey Center for Gun Violence Research.

Why Meadow Died: The People and Policies That Created The Parkland Shooter and Endanger America’s Students

The Parkland school shooting was the most avoidable mass murder in American history. And the policies that made it inevitable are being forced into public schools across America.

“After my sister Meadow was murdered at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the media obsessed for months about the type of rifle the killer used. It was all clickbait and politics, not answers or justice. That wasn’t good enough for us. My dad is a real tough guy, but Meadow had him wrapped around her little finger. He would do anything she wanted, and she would want him to find every answer so that this never happens again.

My dad teamed up with one of America’s leading education experts to launch his own investigation. We found the answers to the questions the media refused to ask. Questions about school safety that go far beyond the national gun debate. And the answers to those questions matter for parents, teachers, and schoolchildren nationwide.

If one single adult in the Broward County school district had made one responsible decision about the Parkland shooter, then my sister would still be alive. But every bad decision they made makes total sense once you understand the district’s politically correct policies, which started here in Broward and have spread to thousands of schools across America.”

—Hunter Pollack, “Foreword”

San Diego military vets challenge California’s weapon ban on batons

SAN DIEGO — A recent wave of court decisions around the country have recognized the constitutional right of citizens to possess arms such as daggers, nunchucks and Tasers for self-defense, and now a pair of San Diego military veterans are challenging California’s ban on another weapon: the baton.

Striking weapons such as billy clubs, blackjacks, leaded canes and saps — described in a 1923 San Diego Union story as “weapons of the holdup man or thug” — have been outlawed in some form or other in the state since at least 1917.

“The Legislature obviously sought to condemn weapons common to the criminal’s arsenal,” a California appellate court wrote about the ban of such weapons in a 1965 ruling.

The law’s only exception extends to peace officers and certain licensed security guards who obtain a state baton permit.

The current law, retooled in 2012, makes possession, importation, sale and manufacture of such weapons a “wobbler,” meaning prosecutors can charge it either as a misdemeanor or felony.

While the law doesn’t explicitly define a billy, courts have determined it to be any kind of stick, bat or baton that is intended to be used as a weapon — even the common baseball bat or table leg would qualify if it is meant to hurt someone else.

A lawsuit filed in San Diego federal court last week argues the ban violates the Second Amendment.

Google is always listening. Now it’s watching, too, with the Nest Hub Max

With the new Nest Hub Max, Google is adding an eye to its talking artificial intelligence. When I flash my palm at the device, a camera spots me and immediately pauses my music. Talk to the hand, robot!

When I walk by a Hub Max, the Google Assistant greets me on its screen, “Good afternoon, Geoffrey.”

This wizardry is made possible by facial recognition. The $230 Nest Hub Max offers a glimpse of how this controversial tech might be used in our homes – if people aren’t too turned off by the privacy implications.

Living with Google’s latest creation for a few days embodied the cognitive dissonance of being a gadget guy in 2019. You can appreciate the fun and wonder of new technology that you also know brings new concerns. I kept wondering: Do any of these camera functions make it worth bringing face surveillance inside my home? Despite some applaudable privacy protections from Google, my family never got to a yes………..

Ultimately, the Hub Max suffers from the same affliction as many new Google products: It’s frighteningly advanced technology that hasn’t identified the problem in our lives that needs solving. None of the camera functions the Hub Max offers today make it worth bringing surveillance inside my house.

‘Gun Battle’ Leaves 21-Year-Old Man Dead In Rankin

RANKIN PA(KDKA) — One person is dead in a shooting in Rankin along Gas Street.

Allegheny County Police say a shooting at 9 p.m. Saturday night at the intersection of Gas Street and North Shore Alley left one dead.

When they arrived on the scene, 21-year-old Emery Heard-Ellis was found on the road with a gunshot wound to his upper torso.

They say their investigation revealed that the Heard-Ellis and a second man were sitting in a Jeep Grand Cherokee when they opened fire on people sitting on a porch.

Someone on the porch returned fire. Police say it’s possible a second person also shot back.

Heard-Ellis and the other man inside the Jeep got out, and police say a “gun battle” ensued.

“I thought it was on the other side of the ball field, but I quickly found out it was out here somewhere,” nearby neighbor and Rankin Councilman William Pfoff said of the shootout.

Police have charged Marcus Carter in relation to the incident. He’s facing multiple charges, including aggravated assault and criminal conspiracy.

Allegheny County Police say Carter was the second person in the Jeep when the fatal shooting occurred.

“I don’t how what the answer is. I don’t know how you control this. I don’t know. I don’t know if anybody knows the answer,” Pfoff said outside his house.

According to court papers, Carter told police that someone he knows as “Vinny” asked him to fight a person he claims beat up his mother. As Vinny drove them over to the house, someone started shooting at them and they returned fire.

“It’s a little unsettling, especially in a quiet area of town like this,” Pfoff said.

Cater is currently in the Allegheny County jail.


Sisters homeowner stops apparent burglary in progress

A Sisters (Oregon) resident stopped an apparent burglary in progress early Monday morning and held the alleged burglar at gunpoint until sheriff’s deputies arrived and arrested him.

Ryan Paul Huber, 43, of Sisters, was arrested on suspicion of first-degree burglary, first-degree criminal trespassing and second-degree criminal mischief and lodged in the Deschutes County jail.

Just before 2 a.m. Monday, a burglary in progress was reported at 1659 W. Carson Ave. in Sisters. Deputies were told an unknown man had broken down the back door of the home and entered, according to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. The homeowner, armed with a rifle, confronted Huber in the home and Huber then left, according to the sheriff’s office.

Huber went to a neighboring home and began ringing the doorbell, according to the sheriff’s office. That homeowner also called 911 and told Huber to leave. Huber then walked to the original home he allegedly broke into, where he was held at gunpoint by the homeowner until sheriff’s deputies arrived.

Huber told deputies he believed his family, who lived nearby, was being held hostage and was in danger, according to the sheriff’s office. Deputies conducting a welfare check at Huber’s nearby home found everyone safe and sleeping.

Deschutes County property records list the owners of the burgled home as Erik and Lucie Pronold.

Fact Check Time: Dana Loesch Shreds New WaPo/ABC News Poll On Gun Control

A new poll conducted by ABC News and the Washington Post was just released. Specifically, pollsters asked Americans what they thought about various gun control proposals. Gun rights advocates have long said that using correct terminology and being familiar with laws that are already on the books is important. Terminology matters because it can mean the difference between a person breaking a law or not. The same goes for knowing what laws already exist.

Radio host and Second Amendment advocate Dana Loesch took to Twitter to explain some of the issues with the ABC News/WaPo poll.

“I’ve never before seen a topic where a lack of education isn’t just encouraged, but is seen as a virtue by leftists politicians and certain members of media. That’s not a convincing enough argument to engender trust in the proposed policies or reporting. Terms matter. Law is written based on certain terms. In some cases, certain terms are the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony,” Loesch told Townhall. “Regarding loading mechanisms: A magazine feeds a chamber and a clip feeds the (internal) magazine. In discussions about magazine bans and capacities, this is an important distinction. So one magazine is the limit but numerous clips are fine? I want to believe that these people are interested in actual solutions, but refusing to learn important terms and why those terms are important makes it hard to believe so.”

Sixth Circuit: 30-day sentence for Rand Paul attacker is too lenient.

Two years, six broken ribs, several bouts of pneumonia, and one hernia surgery later, Rand Paul might finally get the justice he deserves.

In 2017, the Kentucky Republican was attacked by a neighbor while mowing his lawn. He ended up in the hospital and has been in and out several times since. Recently, Paul announced he had to have part of his lung removed due to the damage it sustained during the assault.

Paul’s neighbor, on the other hand, walked away with a mere 30-day prison sentence, which the federal Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals declared “substantively unreasonable” in a ruling released today.

The recommended sentencing for Rene Boucher, 60, who is still Paul’s next-door neighbor, was 21 months of jail time, although the maximum sentence for assaulting a member of Congress is 10 years. But the district court ruled that because this had been an “isolated,” “first time action” that was “strictly a dispute between neighbors,” and because of Boucher’s “excellent background,” Boucher deserved a minor sentence.

The federal government appealed Boucher’s 30-day sentencing, arguing that the seriousness of Paul’s injuries should necessitate a harsher sentencing. The Sixth Circuit agreed and argued Boucher’s personal background — his education, family, and community service — should not have had anything to do with his sentencing.

“These factors are disfavored for good reason,” the court wrote in its opinion ordering the district court to re-sentence Boucher. “To prioritize a defendant’s education, professional success, and standing in the community would give an additional leg up to defendants who are already in a privileged position … That is why Congress and the [federal sentencing] Guidelines oppose a class-based system where accumulated wealth, education, and status serve as credits against a criminal sentence.”