1099 –The Siege of Jerusalem begins during the First Crusade.

1776 – Richard Henry Lee presents the “Lee Resolution” to the Continental Congress. The motion is seconded by John Adams and will lead to the United States Declaration of Independence.

1899 – American Temperance crusader Carrie Nation begins her campaign of vandalizing alcohol-serving establishments by destroying the inventory in a saloon in Kiowa, Kansas.

1942 – The Battle of Midway ends in American victory.

1944 – Battle of Normandy: At Ardenne Abbey, members of the SS Division Hitlerjugend massacre 23 Canadian prisoners of war.

1965 – The Supreme Court of the United States hands down its decision in Griswold v. Connecticut, prohibiting the states from criminalizing the use of contraception by married couples.

1967 – Six-Day War; Israeli soldiers enter Jerusalem.

1971 – The Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Division of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service raids the home of Ken Ballew for illegal possession of hand grenades. Which were later determined to be inert, smoke and practice grenades which are perfectly legal to possess.

1991 – Mount Pinatubo erupts

6 June

1755 – Nathan Hale, American soldier is born in Coventry Connecticut.

1799 – Patrick Henry, American lawyer and politician, 1st Governor of Virginia dies, age 63 at Red Hill Virginia.

1813 – Battle of Stoney Creek; A British force under John Vincent defeats an American force twice its size under William Winder and John Chandler.

1918 – Battle of Belleau Wood; The U.S. Marine Corps suffers its worst single day’s casualties while attempting to recapture the wood at Château-Thierry.

1942 -Battle of Midway; U.S. Navy dive bombers sink the Japanese cruiser Mikuma and four Japanese carriers, Akagi, Kaga, Soryu, Hiryu, which had participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor, six months earlier.

1944 – Operation Overlord; Operation Neptune, 155,000 Allied troops begin the invasion of France with landings on Normandy beaches along with airborne parachute and glider assaults further inland.

Short Film About Tiananmen Square Hero.

On June 4th and 5th, 1989, the Chinese government violently put down the pro-liberty Tiananmen Square student protest. One man stood alone against a column of tanks, and for his extraordinary heroism became known as “Tank Man,” though nothing more is known about his identity. Some say he was arrested and killed, others that he is still in prison in China, and still others that he is alive and in hiding. Regardless, he has become a symbol for resistance against tyranny.

Tank Man is a powerful short film (15 min.) dramatizing events leading up to his moment of extraordinary courage. He is little known in China, where all images of him have been erased and all mention of him banned. This film does him some small justice.

5 June

1837 – Houston is incorporated by the Republic of Texas.

1864 – Battle of Piedmont: Union forces under General David Hunter defeat a Confederate army at Piedmont, Virginia, taking nearly 1,000 prisoners.

1893 – The trial of Lizzie Borden for the murder of her father and step-mother begins in New Bedford, Massachusetts.
“Lizzie Borden took an axe,
And gave her mother forty whacks;
When she saw what she had done,
She gave her father forty-one,”

1917 – Conscription begins in the United States as “Army registration day”.

1942 – The United States declares war on Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania.

1944 – More than 1000 British bombers drop 5,000 tons of bombs on German gun batteries on the Normandy coast in preparation for D-Day.

1945 – The Allied Control Council, the military occupation governing body of Germany, formally takes power.

1967 – The Six-Day War begins: Israel launches surprise strikes against Egyptian air-fields in response to the mobilization of Egyptian forces on the Israeli border.

1968 – Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy is assassinated by Sirhan Sirhan.

2004 – Ronald Reagan, 40th President of the United States dies at his home in Los Angeles

10 Years Ago Today, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 Blasted Off for the First Time

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket has certainly earned its place in history. Falcon 9 is the first orbital class rocket to be reused and the first commercial rocket to ferry human passengers to the ISS.

Each two-stage Falcon 9 rocket is powered by a first stage with a suite of nine Merlin engines, which use kerosene (RP-1) and liquid oxygen propellants, and a second stage powered by a single Merlin vacuum engine. The 230-foot-tall rocket weighs a staggering 1,207,920 pounds and can shuttle a payload weighing 50,265 pounds to low-Earth orbit and a payload of 8,860 pounds to Mars. At sea-level, Falcon 9 can generate a whopping 1.7 million pounds of thrust.

June 4th marks 10 years since the rocket’s inaugural test flight. Since 2010, Falcon 9 has launched 84 times and has safely returned to Earth 45 times. Thirty-one of those rockets have been recycled and flown again. Falcon 9’s reusability revolutionized spaceflight, making it cheaper and more efficient.

 

June 4

1738 – George William Frederick of the United Kingdom, later King George III of England, is born in London.

1862 – Confederate troops evacuate Fort Pillow on the Mississippi River, leaving the way clear for Union troops to take Memphis, Tennessee.

1940  -Dunkirk France; French rearguard action ends as German forces complete a decisive victory over Allied forces that a week earlier had compelled Britain to begin a massive evacuation.

1942 – The Battle of Midway begins. Imperial Japanese Navy forces under the command of Admiral Chūichi Nagumo begin airstrikes on the island.
Reinhard Heydrich, German SS officer finally dies from grenade wounds suffered in a earlier assassination attempt.

1944 – A hunter-killer group of the United States Navy captures the German submarine U-505: The first time a U.S. Navy vessel had captured an enemy vessel at sea since the 19th century.
The United States Fifth Army captures Rome, although much of the German Fourteenth Army is able to withdraw to the north.

3 June

1539 – Hernando de Soto claims Florida for Spain.

1781 – Jack Jouett begins his midnight ride to warn Thomas Jefferson and the Virginia legislature of an impending raid by Lt Colonel Banastre Tarleton.

1942 –Imperial Japan forces begin the Aleutian Islands Campaign by bombing Unalaska Island. This is later regarded as an elaborate, detailed feint to lure  U.S. forces out from Pearl Harbor and keep them just far enough away from the planned invasion of Midway island that they will be unable to respond until the Imperial Navy has set up a trap for the remaining U.S. carriers stationed in the Pacific.

1989 – Iran’s spiritual leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, dies. MHRIH

 

June 1

1215 – Zhongdu, now Beijing,  falls to Mongol forces under the command of Temujin, more well known as the Genghis Khan.

1779 – Benedict Arnold faces is court-martial for malfeasance.
He is finally cleared of all but two charges later in the year.

1792 – Kentucky is admitted as the 15th state of the United States.

1796 – Tennessee is admitted as the 16th state of the United States.

1812 – U.S. President James Madison asks the Congress to declare war on the United Kingdom.

1918 – Battle of Belleau Wood: Allied Forces under the command of then General, later General of the Armies John J. Pershing begin to engage Imperial German Forces, eventually halting their advance and clearing them out of the woods.

1974 – The Heimlich maneuver for rescuing choking victims is published in the journal Emergency Medicine. (By the way, it really does work.)

2011 – Space Shuttle Endeavour makes its final landing after 25 flights. So nine years, less two days, until the U.S., this past Saturday, returned to launching it’s own into space.

SpaceX spacecraft docks with International Space Station on historic NASA mission

SpaceX’s Dragon Endeavour spacecraft crewed by NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken has docked with the International Space Station on its historic Demo-2 mission.

The spacecraft launched atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center Saturday. The mission is the first time that astronauts have launched from American soil since the final Space Shuttle flight in 2011.

The mission is also the first time a private company, rather than a national government, has sent astronauts into orbit………..

On Saturday evening Hurley announced that the spacecraft, previously known as capsule 206, has been renamed Endeavour, continuing the tradition of astronauts naming their capsules.

“We would like to welcome you aboard capsule Endeavour,” he said. “We chose Endeavour for a few reasons – one, because of the incredible Endeavour NASA, SpaceX and the United States has been on since the end of the shuttle program in 2011. The other reason we named it Endeavour is little more personal – Bob and I, we both had our first flight on Shuttle Endeavour and it just meant to much to us to carry on that name.”

30 May

1431 Rouen France; Joan of Arc is burned at the stake as a heretic by the English.

1854, Washington D.C.; The Kansas-Nebraska Act, repealing the Missouri Compromise, is signed into law by President Franklin Pierce. For the next 7 years, the phrase ‘Bleeding Kansas’ comes into use to describe the many conflicts around the question of Kansas being  a state where slavery was legal, or banned.

1942, Cologne Germany; 1000 British bombers take part in the first bombing mission that large in World War II

29 May

1416 Gallipoli, Thrace;  The Venetians under Pietro Loredan defeat a much larger Ottoman fleet off the coast of Gallipoli.

1453 Constantinople falls to the Turkish moslem forces under Mehmet II after a siege starting on April 6th and 500 or so years later, inspires a song.
Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it’s Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works?
That’s nobody’s business but the Turks

1780 Waxhaws South Carolina; British forces under the command of Lt. Colonel Banastre Tarleton continue attacking Continental troops under the command of Colonel Abraham Buford even after they had already surrendered and laid down their arms, killing 113 and critically wounding all but 53.

1903 Belgrade, Serbia;  In the ‘May Coup‘, Alexander I, King of Serbia, and Queen Draga, are assassinated by the Black Hand,  a group of Serbian Army officers bent on forming an independent unified Slavic nation, thus setting the stage for World War 1, as 11 years later,  Young Bosnia, another Slavic unification group, supported by the Black Hand, assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

28 May

585 BC, West Asia; A Solar eclipse, as predicted by Greek philosopher Thales, while Lydians at war with the Medes leads to a truce. One of the cardinal dates from which other dates are calculated.

722 A.D. (more or less) Covadonga Andalus;  Around little more than 10 years after the Moorish invasion and near total conquest of what is now Spain, the inhabitants of the small town of Covadonga led by Pelayo, routed and defeated the moslem forces sent against them. This is considered the first step in the near 800 year long Reconquista of the Iberian peninsula from the moslems.

1830 Washington D.C;  US President Andrew Jackson signs the Indian Removal Act, authorizing the Army to force Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole tribes out of Georgia and surrounding states, setting the stage for the Cherokee Trail of Tears

27 May

1940 Dunkirk France, British and Allied forces begin Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of Dunkirk

1941 North Atlantic Ocean; The German battleship Bismarck is sunk by British naval and air forces.

1942 Doris “Dorie” Miller, the first black man to be so, was awarded the Navy Cross for deeds at Pearl Harbor during the 7 December attacks.
On 19 January, 2020, the Navy announced that CVN-81, a Gerald R. Ford Class aircraft carrier, would be named after him.

1942 Prague Czechoslovakia; Czech resistance fighters nearly botch Operation Anthropoid, the assassination of Nazi Stellvertretender Reichsprotektor Reinhard Heydrich, but do manage to mortally wound him. He finally dies on 4 June.

This Historic Colt 1911 Pistol Carried at Iwo Jima Is About to Go Up for Auction

Marine Sgt. Arthur J. Kiely Jr. sits on in a position on Pacific island during World War II, wearing the 1911 Colt .45 automatic pistol.

Rock Island Auction Company will soon be taking bids for the 1911 Colt .45 automatic pistol, and other kit, carried by a decorated Marine combat photographer during the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II.

Rock Island Auction Company will auction this 1911 Colt .45 automatic pistol, and other kit.

Rock Island Auction Company will auction this pistol belt rig and 1911 Colt .45 automatic pistol.

Rock Island Auction Company will auction “Special Air and Gunnery Target Map” of Iwo Jima.

Following the recent 75th anniversary of Iwo Jima — a brutal battle that stretched from February 19 to March 26, 1945 — the Rock Island, Illinois, auction house will hold its Premier Firearms Auction #79, featuring 2,500 lots of firearms and related items June 5-7.

One of the lots, number 1516, will feature items such as the sidearm, pistol belt rig and rare Iwo Jima battle map that belonged to Marine Sgt. Arthur J. Kiely Jr., who passed away in 2005, according to a recent news release from the auction company.

Kiely joined the Marine Corps in 1943 and served as a combat photographer, taking pictures under heavy enemy fire on island engagements such as Iwo, the release states.

Kiely’s Colt 1911 was originally shipped to the Marine Corps in 1917 and features “85% of its original blue finish showing a mixed brown and gray patina on the grip straps and trigger guard, bright edge wear, and mild spotting and handling marks overall,” according to the auction’s website.

The pistol’s refinished grips have some “dents and tool marks on the screws” and the “modified, refinished replacement trigger sticks a bit,” the website states.

Oppressors Beware

23 May 1994

Medal Of Honor

Citation

Master Sergeant Ivan Gordon, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as Sniper Team Leader, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Master Sergeant Gordon’s sniper team provided precision fires from the lead helicopter during an assault and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. When Master Sergeant Gordon learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the second crash site, he and another sniper unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After his third request to be inserted, Master Sergeant Gordon received permission to perform his volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Master Sergeant Gordon was inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Master Sergeant Gordon immediately pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Master Sergeant Gordon used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers until he depleted his ammunition. Master Sergeant Gordon then went back to the wreckage, recovering some of the crew’s weapons and ammunition. Despite the fact that he was critically low on ammunition, he provided some of it to the dazed pilot and then radioed for help. Master Sergeant Gordon continued to travel the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. After his team member was fatally wounded and his own rifle ammunition exhausted, Master Sergeant Gordon returned to the wreckage, recovering a rifle with the last five rounds of ammunition and gave it to the pilot with the words, “good luck.” Then, armed only with his pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon continued to fight until he was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Master Sergeant Gordon’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army.


Citation

Sergeant First Class Randall Shughart, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as a Sniper Team Member, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Sergeant First Class Shughart provided precision sniper fires from the lead helicopter during an assault on a building and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. While providing critical suppressive fires at the second crash site, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the site. Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After their third request to be inserted, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader received permission to perform this volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader were inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader, while under intense fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Sergeant First Class Shughart pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Sergeant First Class Shughart used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers while traveling the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. Sergeant First Class Shughart continued his protective fire until he depleted his ammunition and was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Sergeant First Class Shughart’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him-self, his unit and the United States Army.

FYI, This is a ‘sticky’ until the 26th.
Honor The Fallen as we remember those who gave in full measure to defend their country. Hail the Victorious Dead.

Most Americans have no clue why we celebrate Memorial Day.

Los Angeles National Cemetery.

Less than half of Americans know the true meaning behind Memorial Day, according to a new survey.

The survey of 2,000 Americans revealed just 43 percent were aware it’s a holiday honoring those who died in service while in the US Armed Forces.

Twenty-eight percent mistakenly believed Memorial Day was a holiday honoring all military veterans who have served in the US Armed Forces — which is actually Veterans Day.

It was revealed to be a common mistake: A third of respondents (36 percent) admitted to being unsure of the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day.

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of University of Phoenix, the survey tested Americans on their knowledge of the upcoming holiday, which, this year, falls on Monday, May 25………….

“For many Americans, Memorial Day is a much-needed day off to relax and enjoy their family. It is important to understand that it is also a solemn day of remembrance. For me, as a combat veteran and for military members and their families, this day holds great significance. Not everyone I served with was fortunate enough to return home,” said Brian Ishmael, senior director, University of Phoenix Office of Military and Veteran Affairs and former US Army sergeant.

Even though there’s some confusion about the holiday, 83 percent of Americans believe it’s important to do something to commemorate Memorial Day.

22 May

337 A.D., Nicomedia – today  İzmit, Turkey;  Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus, otherwise known as Constantine the Great, the first ‘official’  Christian Emperor of Rome, converting at age 40 (although only being baptized on his deathbed), dies at age 65. He ordered the first ecumenical council at Nicea – today İznik , Turkey, in 325 due to a controversy over the relationship of Christ the Son and God the Father resulting in the Nicean Creed.

1176 Aleppo, Syria; Hashshashins fail in their attempt to assassinate  Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn Yūsuf ibn Ayyūb, more well known in the west as Saladin. More’s the pity, as by his military aptitude the moslem forces under his command were able to conquer the army of the Kingdom of Jerusalem and later force the city’s surrender.

And lest we forget the folks in our southern hemisphere:

1858 Bogotá Columbia; Confederación Granadina (now the separate nations of Panama, Colombia & parts of Brazil) is formed by the congress of the Republic of New Granada passing a change in the constitution of that time.

 

14 May

1787, Philadelphia. Delegates to the Convention of the States begin to assemble in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation, which turns out to completely replace the document with a new Constitution to ‘form a more perfect Union’.  Although the convention was originally supposed to begin on May 14, James Madison reported that only a small number had assembled so the ‘official’ convention didn’t begin until May 25

1804, St Louis. The “Corps of Discovery”, more commonly called the ‘Lewis and Clark Expedition’ under the command of Meriweather Lewis leaves St Louis, traveling up the Mississippi river until reaching the Missouri river to travel onwards.

1948, Tel Aviv.  the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel which established a Jewish state in Eretz-Israel, to be known as the State of Israel, which would come into effect on termination of the British Mandate at midnight that day. President Harry Truman immediately recognized Israel the same day.

 

May 10th.

1773, London. King George the 3rd gives his royal assent to the Tea Act passed by Parliament, taxing all tea sold in the American colonies. Seven months later, a group of colonists in Boston put on a Tea Party in the harbor.

1775, New York Colony. In early morning action, Ethan Allen, his Green Mountain Boys, and other militia forces under the command of Benedict Arnold (yes, that Benedict Arnold) take Fort Ticonderoga away from the British.

1869Promontory Point Utah, the ‘Golden Spike’ is driven in (and immediately removed to be replaced by a standard iron spike) to complete the first Transcontinental Railroad.

East and West Shaking hands at the laying of last rail Union Pacific Railroad - Restoration.jpg

 

1920, Los Angeles California. Jeff Cooper is born.